1- Practical Malware Analysis – Introduction


Hi everyone it has been a long time since I last updated this site. It’s been very busy and hectic time as I took on a role as an Information Security Analyst, which was a 12 hour shifts early morning and nights in a very busy environment.

Anyway I am really pleased to be back and thought I will start this with a series of malware analysis, where we will go through step by step.

After this series I have a number of other series to come and plenty of skills to share with you.

I will try to be brief and focus on the hands-on topics and those of you who are more interested in the details please look out for a book called: Practical Malware Analysis by Michael Sikorski and Andrew Honig. It is a great book that I’ve learned a lot from, in fact I am still using it and everything we will discuss here will be skills learned from this valuable book.

So Michael/Andrew if you are looking at this please kindly accept my thanks and appreciation for this marvellous piece of work, keep up the good work guys.

Finally don’t forget everyone, no one knows everything and we will always be learning from each other, therefore those with more experience please kindly don’t hesitate to share your knowledge with us and surely don’t hesitate to correct any mistakes you see here or any of my previous or upcoming articles.

So let’s start with laying some grounds…

Continue reading 1- Practical Malware Analysis – Introduction

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2. Guidelines For Secure Network Administration – part 1


Installing networks and making sure they’re able to communicate and talk to each other is the end of it for a network administrator. There are some guidelines that many admins neglect, which exposes the network and makes them vulnerable to attacks. In this section I’ll try to cover some of these guidelines. These guideline can be used as a general security guidelines and not just network security.

Rule-based Management

Firewalls, proxies, routers, IDPSs (IDS/IPS), antivirus, and more are example of rule-based security devices. Rule-based managements is a method of controlling the network activity via the use of rule-based devices. Each rule can either be explicit allow or deny. Continue reading 2. Guidelines For Secure Network Administration – part 1

1. Network Security – part 2


1.1.        Security functions of network devices – Continued

VPN Concentrator

VPN (Virtual Private Network) will be discussed in the future as a chapter of its own due to its importance in the network security world.

VPN concentrators are sometimes known by many other names such as VPN servers, VPN firewalls, VPN RAS (VPN Remote Access Servers), VPN Proxies, etc.

VPN concentrators allows for high availability, high scalability and performance for VPN connections. They’re hardware appliances designed to facilitate a large number of multiple simultaneous VPN connections, usually hundreds or even in some implementations thousands of simultaneous VPN connections. Continue reading 1. Network Security – part 2

1. Network Security – Part 1


1.1.        Security functions of network devices

Firewalls

Firewalls are security devices designed to control traffic and protect networks from each other they’re usually applied to protect high trust networks from low trust ones or to stop networks part of the same organisation but from different departments. They can be either hardware or software.

There are four different types of firewalls:

Packet filter Firewalls – uses the packet header to do basic traffic filtering usually based of the source and destination address, port numbers and protocols. They operate in the network and transport layers of the OSI model. Continue reading 1. Network Security – Part 1

Uses of free Unix-based Security Tools to Develope Secure Systems – Part 4


4.    ENUMERATION

“Enumeration can best be defined as the process of counting. From a security standpoint, it’s the process the attacker follows before an attack. The attacker is attempting to count or identify systems and understand their role or purpose.

This may mean the identification of open ports, applications, vulnerable services, DNS or NetBIOS names, and IP addresses before an attack.”

Michael Gregg (2008, p 149)

This means at this stage it’s only a matter of time before the attacker compromises a system on the network.

The main aim of this stage is to find:

Uses of free Unix-based Security Tools to Develope Secure Systems – Part 3


3.    SCANNING

At this stage an attacker would’ve got a list of IP ranges, DNS servers, Mail servers, employee names and phone numbers. All this would be used by attackers to probe our network to see which systems are alive and the services running on them.

There are many tools and techniques available to accomplish this.

Ping sweeps basically a method used to find out which of a range of IP addresses are a live and reachable from the internet.

Fping can be used on large networks, it doesn’t wait for a reply before trying the next IP, it sends many requests in parallel.

root@bt:#fping -a -f ipadd.txt

-a – shows systems that are alive.

-d – resolves hostnames.

-f – read from file.

-h – help.

Nmap is another tool that can be used for ping sweeps.

root@bt:#nmap –sP 192.168.1.0/24

There are other methods that can be used if ICMP is blocked but they are not as accurate as Continue reading Uses of free Unix-based Security Tools to Develope Secure Systems – Part 3

Uses of free Unix-based Security Tools to Develope Secure Systems – Part 2


2.    FOOT PRINTING

The aim of foot printing is to gather as much information as possible about the organisation and its network. One would ask why would I need to perform such step when I have all the information about my network?

Joel Scambray, Stuart McClure and George Kurtz (2009, page 10), answers this question:

“Foot printing is necessary for one basic reason: it gives you a picture of what the hacker sees. And if you know what the hacker sees, you know what potential security exposures you have in your environment. And when you know what exposures you have, you know how to prevent exploitation.

Hackers are very good at one thing: getting inside your head, and you don’t even know it. They are systematic and methodical in gathering all pieces of information related to the technologies used in your environment. Without a sound methodology for performing this type of reconnaissance yourself, you are likely to miss key pieces of information related to a specific technology or organization—but trust me, the hacker won’t.”

…….

“Foot printing is one of the most important steps and it must be performed accurately and in a controlled fashion.” Continue reading Uses of free Unix-based Security Tools to Develope Secure Systems – Part 2